Common Winter Weeds in Pastures and Hay Meadows

Buttercup (Ranunculus spp) Spray buttercup in late February or early March before it flowers. This weed is easily controlled with 2,4-D amine, Metsulfuron 60 DF, Cimarron Plus, Grazon P+D, GrazonNext HL and dicamba + 2,4-D (Weedmaster). In dormant bermudagrass/bahiagrass glyphosate (Roundup) will control buttercup at normal use rates.   Groundsel (Senecio spp) Metsulfuron 60DF or Cimarron Plus has proved to be the most effective herbicide for groundsel control. Apply in the rosette stage (~March). Grazon P+D provides partial control.   Red Sorrel (Rumex acetosella)   Grazon P+D provides… Read More →

Soil Amendments

Soil additives are different from traditional fertilizers and soil amendments in that they usually have little or no nutrient content. There is no requirement for these products to have a guaranteed analysis label, as long as they make no claim(s) regarding fertilizer value (i.e. N-P-K). Many of these products state on the label that they are not a substitute for a fertilizer program, but enhance the effectiveness of fertilizer normally applied or make nutrients in the soil more available to the crop. They are claimed to improve soil… Read More →

Feeding Hay to Reduce Waste

On many farms, hay feeding losses are as high as storage losses. Some hay losses during feeding can be expected with any feeding system, but the amount of loss varies with the system used. The major objective for any feeding system should be to keep loses to a practical minimum level, thus permitting animals to consume the majority of hay offered at feeding. Feeding losses include trampling, leaf shatter, chemical and physical deterioration, fecal contamination, and refusal. Feeding in only one area can cause excessive sod destruction, usually… Read More →

Weed of the Week: Grassbur (field sandbur, sandbur, etc.)

Grassbur is a grass weed that is very troublesome in pastures and hay meadows throughout Texas. Most grassburs are easily recognized in the mature stage of growth when the “bur” seed heads become apparent. The bur itself is actually a “capsule” that usually contains from 1 to 3 seeds. We tend to think of the grassbur species as a warm season annual plant. However, many grassburs are classified as perennials because they can survive from one year to the next. The presence of grassburs can be an indication… Read More →

Overton Pesticide CEU Program

Overton Pesticide CEU Program November 3, 2022 Virtual webinar   Morning Session (8:30 – 11:30 am) Weed Control Strategies for Pastures and Hay Fields Aquatic Weed Control Laws and Regulations of Pesticide Use Afternoon Session (1:00 – 3:00 pm) Cattle External Parasite Control Control of Forage Insect Pests 5 CEUs approved FLYER        

Fall-Planted Forage Mixtures for White-Tailed Deer in Texas

The options for fall-planted wildlife mixtures are many but often the random mixtures offered for sale by national retailers are not the best-adapted plants for Texas.  Warm season forage legumes, cool season forage legumes and forage oats are all great choices to include in forage mixtures for white-tailed deer in Texas.  One problem with planting mixtures of these three forages is determining the correct planting rate for each forage species so that competition is minimized and each species can be productive.   Planting rate experiments with cowpeas, oats… Read More →

Planting Winter Forages

Late September-early October is the ideal time for planting cool season annual forages such as annual ryegrass, small grains (rye, wheat or oats) and/or cool season annual legumes. Anytime we are incorporating new forages into our production systems it is important to make sure to match the forage species to your location (soil type, average annual rainfall, intended use, etc). If you have questions about forages appropriate for your area contact your local county extension agent. Three methods for establishing cool-season annual grasses include planting into a prepared… Read More →

Reduce Winter Feeding Program August 26th

Reduce Winter Feeding with Stockpiled Forage and Winter Pasture   Friday, August 26 2019 VIRTUAL Would you prefer to feed hay for 60 days? 100 days? or 150 days? Here’s an opportunity to learn how to significantly reduce your hay feeding needs.   Topics Include: Stockpiled forage: management and utilization How many acres do you need of stockpiled forage and winter pasture? Cool-season forages and variety selection Establishment and fertilization Grazing and utilization strategies Monthly and seasonal forage production potential Appropriate mineral supplementation Estimated costs      … Read More →

Stockpiling Bermudagrass or Bahiagrass

A different winter feeding approach, other than hay, could be the use of standing or stockpiled warm season perennials (such as bermudagrass or bahiagrass). These forages are allowed to accumulate in the field for grazing during fall and early winter. Stockpiled bermudagrass can provide the required nutrition for dry, pregnant cows through January if the appropriate procedure is followed. Producers should plan on providing approximately 45 to 60 days of grazing with the dormant bermudagrass. In most instances, stockpiled bermudagrass should be used up by January. Once the… Read More →

Hay Testing…Know What You’re Feeding

One of the first considerations when purchasing hay is that it should be based on individual animal requirements. For optimal production, forage quality should be matched as closely as possible to the nutritional needs of the animal. Low quality forage can result in reduced animal performance and increased supplemental feeding costs. Whereas hay of sufficient quality, little or no supplementation will be necessary to meet the animals’ nutritional needs. Keep in mind that not all forage or hay is created equal. There is great variation between forages and… Read More →