Warm Season Annual Forages

Believe it or not, we can actually grow some forages other than Bermudagrass and Bahiagrass in Texas! Warm season perennial grasses, such as bermudagrass and bahiagrass, make great foundations for pastures in Texas. However, there are additional forages that can be utilized for pasture or hay production in Texas. As always, when selecting forage species make sure to match species and variety to your location (soil type and average rainfall) as well as to your production system goals. For assistance in selecting a forage species and/or variety contact… Read More →

Renovation

During the dormant season we often get anxious for warm weather and green pastures so we start thinking about renovation. Renovation is a practice or series of management practices which “restores the vigor” or “makes new again.” In pasture management, renovation refers to improvement of a permanent pasture by changed management. Renovation of bermudagrass pastures may be as simple as soil testing and applying proper fertilization; or, it may be as complex and intensive as destroying the existing sod, preparing a seedbed and sprigging again.   Some renovation… Read More →

Basic Principles of Forage Quality

Basic Principles of Forage Quality AgriLife Extension conducts many programs across Texas on different kinds of forages.  We all know forage quality is important.  My observation is that many hay growers and hay feeders don’t test for it.  In fact, at sale I am sure most forage changes hands in Texas with no measurement of forage quality.  But forage quality indeed is a value factor.  Forage is not just about tons of hay per acre. A New Mexico State University colleague, research forage agronomist Leonard Lauriault, Tucumcari, shared… Read More →

East Texas Pasture Management

Friday, February 22, 2019 Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center 1710 N. Hwy 3053, Overton, TX 75684   Spraying Equipment Soil Fertility & Fertilizers Drift Management Laws & Regulations of Pesticide Use Save Money by Understanding Active Ingredients, Residual Control and Herbicide Cost   Program starts 1:00 pm Adjourn 6:00 pm   5 Pesticide CEUs Available    Preregister by Feb. 20, 2019: Cost: $25/ person On-Site Registration Cost: $35/person  Register online at: https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu; or call Extension Conference Services @ 979-845-2604         Vanessa Corriher-Olson, Ph.D…. Read More →

Weed of the Week: Grassbur (field sandbur, sandbur, etc.)

Grassbur is a grass weed that is very troublesome in pastures and hay meadows throughout Texas. Most grassburs are easily recognized in the mature stage of growth when the “bur” seed heads become apparent. The bur itself is actually a “capsule” that usually contains from 1 to 3 seeds. We tend to think of the grassbur species as a warm season annual plant. However, many grassburs are classified as perennials because they can survive from one year to the next. The presence of grassburs can be an indication… Read More →

Sprayer Maintenance

Sprayer Calibration

Now’s a good time to start your sprayer maintenance before the active spraying season begins. Tuning up your sprayer can better prepare you for accurate and effective herbicide applications. Any sprayer, old or new will perform better if you check it over before heading into the field. The most common causes of inconsistent spray patterns are nozzle tips with different fan angles on the boom, uneven boom heights and clogged nozzles. Follow manufacturer recommendations to select nozzles for the best coverage. Make sure nozzles are clear of debris… Read More →

Does a New Year Mean a New Pasture/Hay Meadow?

It’s always best to initiate the planning process the year prior to actual planting. So start planning in 2019 to plant in 2020. Instead of planning in 2019 to plant in 2019. Evaluate the farm’s forage needs. Consider how the forage will be used (grazing vs. hay), what species are better adapted to your area (season, soil type, rainfall) and what resources (equipment, money, and time) are available. Reestablishment should be considered when less than 40% of the desirable species exist. For exclusive hay production: Take visual appraisal… Read More →

Merry Christmas!

    Merry Christmas from my family to yours! Wishing everyone a joyous holiday season.       Vanessa Corriher-Olson, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Forage Extension Specialist Soil & Crop Sciences Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, Overton,TX vacorriher@ag.tamu.edu 903-834-6191    

Hay Meadow’s Friend or Foe?

Annual Ryegrass…a cool season annual forage often utilized by livestock producers for winter grazing. However, it’s often deemed an enemy of many a hay producer in East Texas. Volunteer annual ryegrass can be common in hay meadows. Winter rainfalls can promote seed germination and seeds can survive for multiple years in our soils. Later maturity of annual ryegrass can delay or prevent our warm season perennial forages (i.e. bermudagrass or bahiagrass) from breaking dormancy in April/May therefore delaying our initial hay cutting.   So how do we manage… Read More →

Eastern Texas Forage Calendar

Need a last minute Christmas gift or an extra stocking stuffer… Landowners interested in managing forage production for grazing and/or hay can use this calendar for management suggestions specific to each month and to record the dates of the management tasks performed. Keeping a record of management activities by date can help you document your management strategies for your pastures each year. To order a copy visit: http://agrilifebookstore.org