East Texas Pasture Management

Friday, February 19, 2021 Virtual Program Forage Fertilization Considerations Weed Control in Pastures and Hay Meadows Laws and Regulations of Pesticide Use Effects of Alternative Nutrient Sources on Bermudagrass Production Active Ingredients, Application Rates, and Herbicide Costs FLYER Registration: Cost: $25/person Register online at: https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu/overton; or call Extension Conference Services @ 979-845-2604 The program will be divided into 2 sessions to allow attendees to have a break between sessions 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM                

Soil Amendments

Soil additives are different from traditional fertilizers and soil amendments in that they usually have little or no nutrient content. There is no requirement for these products to have a guaranteed analysis label, as long as they make no claim(s) regarding fertilizer value (i.e. N-P-K). Many of these products state on the label that they are not a substitute for a fertilizer program, but enhance the effectiveness of fertilizer normally applied or make nutrients in the soil more available to the crop. They are claimed to improve soil… Read More →

Potassium is for Persistence

We rely heavily on our bermudagrass pastures and hay meadows during the summer in some parts of Texas. Often times we are disappointed with production, see a thinning of our stand and/or see disease like symptoms. This is often times referred to as “Bermudagrass Decline.” We quickly blame weather. Granted weather can have an impact on each of those issues. However, there is often a deeper problem that we need to access. Primary Causes: Low Potassium (K) Fertility: A deficiency in K will result in poor stress tolerance,… Read More →

Common Winter Weeds in Pastures and Hay Meadows

Buttercup (Ranunculus spp) Spray buttercup in late February or early March before it flowers. This weed is easily controlled with 2,4-D amine, Metsulfuron 60 DF, Cimarron Plus, Grazon P+D, GrazonNext HL and dicamba + 2,4-D (Weedmaster). In dormant bermudagrass/bahiagrass glyphosate (Roundup) will control buttercup at normal use rates.   Groundsel (Senecio spp) Metsulfuron 60DF or Cimarron Plus has proved to be the most effective herbicide for groundsel control. Apply in the rosette stage (~March). Grazon P+D provides partial control.   Red Sorrel (Rumex acetosella)   Grazon P+D provides… Read More →

Merry Christmas!

    Merry Christmas from my family to yours! Wishing everyone a joyous holiday season.       Vanessa Corriher-Olson, Ph.D. Professor, Forage Extension Specialist Soil & Crop Sciences Texas A&M AgriLife Extension, Overton,TX vacorriher@ag.tamu.edu 903-834-6191    

Hay Meadow’s Friend or Foe?

Annual Ryegrass…a cool season annual forage often utilized by livestock producers for winter grazing. However, it’s often deemed an enemy of many a hay producer in East Texas. Volunteer annual ryegrass can be common in hay meadows. Winter rainfalls can promote seed germination and seeds can survive for multiple years in our soils. Later maturity of annual ryegrass can delay or prevent our warm season perennial forages (i.e. bermudagrass or bahiagrass) from breaking dormancy in April/May therefore delaying our initial hay cutting.   So how do we manage… Read More →

Winter Weeds: Do they matter?

As forage producers, we focus most of our energy on our warm season perennial pastures and hay meadows (bermudagrass, bahiagrass, etc.). That means most of our weed control efforts are also focused on warm season weeds (such as carolina horsenettle, blackberry, etc). Unfortunately, cool season weeds can be just as detrimental to our warm season perennial forages.   Annual ryegrass…a cool season annual forage often utilized by livestock producers for winter grazing. However, it’s often deemed an enemy of many a hay producer in East Texas. Later maturity… Read More →

Weed of the Week: Thistles

If left uncontrolled, thick thistle stands can reduce grazing and result in less forage production. A single thistle plant can produce at least 4,000 seeds, which increases the chance for higher thistle populations in the pasture the following year. Consequently, management practices need to be conducted prior to flower formation for effective thistle control. Even if thistles have not infested your pasture in the past, it is ideal that your pastures are scouted in late fall through mid-spring (November to March) to ensure that thistles do not get… Read More →

Fertilization of Winter Pasture

Fertilization of winter pasture should be based on a soil test to maximize forage production and prevent applying more fertilizer than is needed. Nitrogen fertilization of small grain and small grain-ryegrass mixtures can be split in 2 to 4 equal applications during the growing season. Two applications are often sufficient in Central Texas with lower rainfall and heavier textured soils. Three or four applications are required on the sandy soils in East Texas because of low nutrient holding capacity and high rainfall. Phosphorus and potassium can be applied… Read More →

Weed of the Week: Broomsedge Bluestem

Broomsedge Bluestem (Andropogon virginicus L.) is a warm season perennial grass found throughout Central and East Texas. Broomsedge growth begins as temperatures consistently stay above 60 degrees F. It produces many seeds that are distributed by wind. It is a poor competitor, has poor nutritive value for livestock and low palatability. Broomsedge can quickly become the dominant species in over-grazed, low pH (< 5.5), low fertility, eroded soils where desired vegetation will not thrive. Since this plant thrives on low pH and low fertility soils, soil testing is… Read More →