Weed of the Week: Mayweed chamomile

Mayweed chamomile, often called dog fennel, stinking chamomile, or stinking mayweed is an annual bushy broadleaf plant that germinates in early spring. Mayweed chamomile inhabits crop fields, roadsides, pastures, hay meadows and other disturbed, unmanaged sites. Leaves are alternate to one another along the stem, are lobed to deeply divided, and nearly hairless to hairy.

Mayweed Chamomile

Mayweed Chamomile

Mayweed chamomile can have a spreading form or be an erect plant, reaching 6 inches to 3 feet long. A distinguishing characteristic of mayweed is it’s unpleasant odor. Flowering takes place from spring into summer depending on location and temperatures. Tiny flowers cluster to form a daisey-like flowerhead with white flowers and a yellow center.¬†Mayweed chamomile reproduces by seed.

Select Herbicide Options:

(Always read pesticide labels for appropriate rates and any restrictions)

Weedmaster

2, 4-D

GrazonNext HL

Grazon P+D

Pasturall HL

Surmount

Milestone

Chaparral (labeled for use in bermudagrass pastures and hay meadows; will control bahiagrass)

Cimarron Plus (labeled for use in bermudagrass pastures and hay meadows; will control bahiagrass)

Pastora (labeled for use in bermudagrass pastures and hay meadows; will control bahiagrass)

 

Vanessa Corriher-Olson

Forage Extension Specialist

Soil & Crop Sciences

Overton, TX

vacorriher@ag.tamu.edu

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service

Texas A&M University System

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